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Lagoon of Mystery
Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 561
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 2018-01-27 6:12 pm   Permalink

Much appreciated, Hiltiki! It still seems like soooooo much is left to do, but I look at where I started from and, to quote Keanu Reeves, "Whoa!"

You're so sweet, Wendy. You make Tiki Central worth visiting for your positive outlook alone! Just between you and me, you're probably visiting this thread the right amount. My updates are coming in fits and starts now because 1) winter 2) lack of free cash and 3) necessary but unglamourous work. At the moment I'm currently repairing the wooden deck adjacent the pool. It was make of red cedar, which is naturally decay resistant--if it's taken care of. Unfortunately, the previous owners never did any preventive maintenance and there's a lot of rot in addition to UV damage. Pulling up the planks, cutting away the rot, sanding them smooth and weatherproofing is pretty tedious. It's something that needs to be done, but isn't going to change the look of the place by much, if any. Not everything can be eye candy.


 
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danlovestikis
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Jun 17, 2002
Posts: 7547
Posted: 2018-01-27 7:44 pm   Permalink


I totally understand. I hate dusting our plantation blinds and that only took us a couple of days. But yours is all about safety first. I hope it all works out. My pointer is screws are so much better than nails. I had a mother who would build rooms on homes. Wendy

PS you are super nice


 
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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 561
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 2018-01-27 8:20 pm   Permalink

I agree completely on nails-vs-screws. My son cut his foot open this past summer on a nail that'd worked its way up out of the wood. That was part of the impetus for this. That, and the fact some of the boards are completely rotted through at the far end. And there are random screws here and there from when the planks started to come loose, except the nails are still in place and the rusting screws are impossible to see until I've already split the plank apart with a crowbar trying to get it up. It's an unfun mess. Near as I can tell, the previous owners laid the cedar boards down and never did anything else to preserve or maintain them. The top sides have serious UV damage (the natural version of the Witco look) whereas the undersides have fungus eating away at 'em. I'm cutting away far more bad wood than I'd hoped to. Next weekend I'll have to make a run to the lumber yard to buy planks to fill in the gaps. Oh, and they built the deck out of 2"x6" red cedar boards, rather than 1"x6" decking planks. Which is all well and good, except for the fact that it's going to cost more $$ to replace.

On the bright side, once I'm finished with this, we'll be ready to start some killer landscaping. Variegated ginger, hardy hibiscus, dwarf palmettos, some more banana plants... this place is going to look crazy tropical.


 
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danlovestikis
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Jun 17, 2002
Posts: 7547
Posted: 2018-01-28 4:05 pm   Permalink


I don't know about Texas but banana plants die in the winters here and have to be cut down each winter. Such a huge mess as they get bigger. We had planted 16 of them in our backyard when we told that every month we needed to put a pill in the water at the base of every leaf to kill off the mosquito larva that will grow there. We have West Nile Virus in our town carried by mosquitoes, no Zika yet but we took this advise to heart and took out the banana trees.

Never fails that there's something that can go wrong.

Best wishes for your project, Wendy


 
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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 561
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 2018-01-28 8:32 pm   Permalink

I'm straddling boundary of Zone 8b and 9a. Some bananas are more cold-tolerant than others. With the aid of frost blankets and some Christmas lights they survived 16F a few weeks ago. Unfortunately, the same can't be said of a bunch of fruit that had set back in September. They started turning black, so that was that. The plant survived, but I cut it down since bananas only fruit once. Bananas haven't been an issue as far as mosquitoes go--that's a whole other story. They were really bad around here until I chopped out all the Lady Banks roses and Carolina jasmine that were giving them shelter. I've also got some Bird of Paradise and plumeria in the ground that've survived winter thus far. I just have to make sure to pay attention to the weather forecast. Next year will be more of a challenge once they're bigger, but so far, so good.

 
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Cap'n_Crafty_McGrim_II
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Dec 10, 2016
Posts: 52
From: New Orleans
Posted: 2018-02-01 12:30 pm   Permalink

I didnt know bananas only fruit once.

 
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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 561
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 2018-02-01 6:57 pm   Permalink

Yes, they only fruit once. But the parent plant suckers pups, and these will fruit in turn. Under the right conditions, you can get a grove of banana plants after starting with just one.

 
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Cap'n_Crafty_McGrim_II
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Dec 10, 2016
Posts: 52
From: New Orleans
Posted: 2018-02-02 1:24 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2018-02-01 18:57, Prikli Pear wrote:
Yes, they only fruit once. But the parent plant suckers pups, and these will fruit in turn. Under the right conditions, you can get a grove of banana plants after starting with just one.


Nice! I have to try that!


 
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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 561
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 2018-02-02 6:31 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2018-02-02 13:24, Cap'n_Crafty_McGrim_II wrote:
Quote:

On 2018-02-01 18:57, Prikli Pear wrote:
Yes, they only fruit once. But the parent plant suckers pups, and these will fruit in turn. Under the right conditions, you can get a grove of banana plants after starting with just one.


Nice! I have to try that!


Bananas like three things: Lots of sunshine, water and fertilizer (composted manure is great, and better for them than chemical alternatives). Give them that and you'll have more plants than you know what to do with. Basjoo is a super-cold-hardy Japanese cultivar that has inedible fruit but is used for its fiber. If you're not worried about fruit, it's a great low-care choice. And there are super-dwarf varieties that can be grown in pots for the space/climate impaired. The edible types generally take a year of uninterrupted growth before they fruit (that is, if they freeze to the ground, the clock resets) and another 4-5 months or so after that for the fruit to mature and ripen.
Going Bananas has a great variety of banana cultivars and descriptions. Their plants are grown from tissue culture, which ensures they're true to type and disease free. I've bought from them in the past and have been impressed with the quality of the plants I've received in the mail.

[ This Message was edited by: Prikli Pear 2018-02-02 18:31 ]


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rgordo1147
Member

Joined: May 20, 2017
Posts: 3
From: Palm Harbor, FL
Posted: 2018-02-11 5:13 pm   Permalink

Spent some quality time with your thread and what you’ve accomplished so far is really impressive. I’ve been debating whether to break out my trim router and Dremmel to try my hand at carving - you’ve given me the inspiration to do it!

 
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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 561
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 2018-02-11 9:07 pm   Permalink

That's the spirit, rgordo! Look, I'd never done any detail work with a router until those first triangle base boards upstream. All I'd ever done was 1/2 inch deep dado cuts. When you lock down a straight edge to act as a rip fence, those are super easy. Decorative router work? Not nearly so cut and dried. There's a steep learning curve, but the good thing is that all you need is maybe 10 minutes practice on scrap wood, then you've got it. Dremel's a little different, but the good thing there is that the scale is so much smaller that screw-ups are easier to cover up.

The best advice I can give is to plan it out. Cut out templates in card stock if you're going with a repeating pattern, and trace that onto the wood to guide you. And don't get too complicated to start out. Stay simple, and increase the amount of detail when you feel ready for it.

[ This Message was edited by: Prikli Pear 2018-02-11 21:08 ]


 
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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 561
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 2018-02-16 07:54 am   Permalink

Elsewhere on Tiki Central I posted about making jackfruit-infused rum. Why jackfruit? Because it's an unusual, distinctive tropical flavor that's not really available outside of Juicy Fruit gum, and I have access to the stuff. I tried the jackfruit rum in a daiquiri. It was very flavorful but also way too sweet--that jackfruit brought a lot of fruit sugars along with it. Clearly, I needed to craft a signature cocktail for the Lagoon of Mystery around it.



I ended up with two cocktails. The first is super-fruity that I'll get around to sharing in the future. The second, the Jaguarundi, is an offshoot I'm sharing now. It evolved from an experiment with agricole that didn't work, but showed promise. I also found that using coconut milk had a positive effect on the drink's flavor, texture and mouthfeel. I don't like coconut normally. The texture of shredded coconut makes me gag. The flavor's normally too sweet and cloying. But an encounter with fresh coconut water during a trip to Jamaica some years ago showed me that all coconut is not created equal. I'm more open now to incorporating coconut into cocktails, although I still don't really like Coco Lopez, Coco Real and the like.



Jaguarundi
by Jayme Blaschke
1.5 oz. Jackfruit-infused Puerto Rican rum
1 oz. Agricole vieux (Rhum Clément V.S.O.P.)
1 oz. Lime juice
1 oz. Coconut milk (unsweetened!)
.5 oz. Pineapple juice
.5 oz. Ginger syrup
.5 tsp. Grenadine (pomegranate grenadine only--if you only have that nasty high fructose corn syrup stuff, skip entirely)
.5 tsp. Falernum
2 dashes Celery bitters (Fee Bros.)
1 dash Angostura bitters

Combine all ingredients in a shaker tin with crushed ice and shake until frost forms on outside of tin. Gated pour into poco grande glass or tiki mug (I normally use a tiki mug, but went with the poco grande this time to show off the drink better) and add crushed ice to fill (I use the ice from the mixing tin). Garnish with a pineapple frond and candied ginger on a cocktail pick. A sprig of mint is okay too, if you're so inclined.

I searched the interwebz and didn't really come up with any recipes that are similar, even allowing for the rarity of jackfruit rum. Probably the biggest influences here are Brazilian batidas and the 3 Dots and a Dash, but it doesn't really taste like either of those. I'm by no means a polished mixologist, but I have to say I'm surprisingly pleased with my first real cocktail recipes.


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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 561
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 2018-02-18 7:56 pm   Permalink

As promised, my other jackfruit-infused rum cocktail, the Coatimundi:



Coatimundi

1 oz. Jackfruit-infused rum
1 oz. Demerara rum (I used El Dorado 8 )
1 oz. Lime juice
1 oz. Coconut milk
.5 oz. Passionfruit juice (Passionfruit syrup will make it too sweet, unless you're into that. I use Sunberry Farms passionfruit juice)
.5 oz. Cinnamon syrup
2 dashes Angostura bitters

Combine all ingredients in a shaker tin with crushed ice and shake until frost forms on outside of tin. Gated pour into poco grande glass or tiki mug (I normally use a tiki mug, but went with the poco grande this time to show off the drink better) and add crushed ice to fill (I use the ice from the mixing tin). Garnish with a cinnamon stick along with a kumquat wrapped in a loop of lime peel on a cocktail pick.

[ This Message was edited by: Prikli Pear 2018-02-18 19:57 ]

[ This Message was edited by: Prikli Pear 2018-02-18 20:50 ]


 
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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 561
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 2018-04-04 8:33 pm   Permalink

Lucked into this hanging lamp find on CL. Was listed as "bamboo lamp" but turns out it's made of steel or brass or similar metal. This sucker's heavy! Big, too--39" top to bottom. And check out the detail. Once I get some flicker bulbs in it, it will be stunning. Now I just have to figure out where it goes.










_________________
~Jayme
_____________________
Lagoon of Mystery
www.JaymeBlaschke.com


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littlegiles
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 08, 2003
Posts: 730
From: Lancaster, SC
Posted: 2018-04-06 08:57 am   Permalink

Great score on that lamp! Placing it somewhere may be a challenge.

 
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