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Lagoon of Mystery
mike and marie
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 24, 2008
Posts: 337
Posted: 2017-03-20 6:21 pm   Permalink

Nice transform on the lights. Looks great!

 
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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 269
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 2017-03-21 07:23 am   Permalink

Thanks, Mike and Marie! It was pretty simple to do, but the time investment was way beyond what it should've been. Which I'm finding is applicable to pretty much all of my projects, across the board. I'm in a holding pattern at the moment on tikification (at least, directly so--lots of indirect projects will ultimately contribute down the road). I'm hoping to have some transformation a little more substantial to share in a few weeks.

 
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mike and marie
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 24, 2008
Posts: 337
Posted: 2017-03-21 10:13 pm   Permalink

Us too, time is a killer on these things. Trying to change that.

Looking forward to seeing what you have to share.


 
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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 269
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 2017-05-22 1:12 pm   Permalink

Work continues on my bar expansion, but I'm not quite at a point to share my progress. To make sure you folks don't think I've dropped off the map, though, here's an undertaking from the weekend. I had to take down the outdoor speakers mounted on the patio ceiling, and the previous owners had smeared them with Tanglefoot. I mentioned their obsession with the stuff during my light sconce reconstruction. Well, it's even nastier on speakers. Don't believe me? Take a look:





I hosed the speakers off in the driveway, which got rid of at least some of the non-Tanglefoot gunk, then scrubbed with mineral spirits, which finally removed the sticky goo, but damn, that was nasty. My efforts revealed speakers that were originally white, but had turned whiteish-gray due to UV exposure. Even out of direct sunlight as they were, the plastic casing was brittle and crumbly in places. I don't know if Bamboo Ben has a thing against white speakers to go with white walls and ceilings, but I couldn't put them back up like they were. I got a couple cans of spray paint, and painted both speakers with a tan base coat. Then I broke out the masking tape and cut out some wedge patterns and masked off other areas.



Then I sprayed them down with a coat of darker brown. Once the paint dried to the touch, I removed the tape, then let the paint set completely.



Next, the speaker covers. I started off thinking they'd just be solid, then thought maybe I'd add some patterns, and finally decided to try faces. I taped down the design, sprayed, then pulled up the tape. This is the result.



Encouraged by my initial success, I tried to get a little more complicated with the second speaker. I don't think it turned out nearly as well, but is still better than the grungy goop-covered speakers that were there before. Here's a couple final shots of them re-installed.





I've got a more detailed writeup on my blog, with more step-by-step photos, if anyone's interested:
http://jlbgibberish.blogspot.com/2017/05/tiki-build-along-pt-4.html




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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 269
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 2017-05-24 2:29 pm   Permalink

Initially, I thought the back bar would take up the entire space between the garage door and the French doors on the back patio, about 12'. The Wife nixed that idea, and she was probably right. That would've created some logistical problems. Instead, I had an 8'x20" piece of plywood was just about the perfect size for a more compact back bar. Instead of centering it directly under the porthole bathroom window, I'd offset it to the left. One reason is to ensure free flow of traffic through the French doors to the right.



A bigger reason, as you can see below, is that there is an electrical outlet, water spigot and obsolete propane outlet on the left side that needed covering. I measured the legs and frame so that the top of the back bar would be equal in height to the under bar area of the extant tiki bar.



Flipping the frame upright showed me that the pebble-finish patio wasn't anywhere close to being level, so I had to add leg levelers. I didn't really want the wood in contact with the concrete, so this worked out well. The next step was to coat everything with Flood CWF-UV. It won't ever be directly exposed to rain or sun, but I want to be able to hose down the patio if necessary and humidity can be pretty high for extended periods. The additional protection seemed prudent.



For the tiki bar top, I used thin, laminate flooring tile pulled up from my office as part of another project. Continuing that for the back bar was the obvious course of action. I managed to pull up a whole piece of flooring about 9'x4' and used a jig saw to cut out the bar top. To secure it to the plywood top of the back bar (which I'd attached to the frame with outdoor wood screws) I slathered Titebond III along the edges and corners (because that's all I had left of that glue) and filled in the gaps with Titebond II.



Then I clamped and weighted the laminate down for 24-plus hours to let the glue set.



And this is what it looks like with all the junk removed. It doesn't look all that great, I'll admit, but at least it's finally starting to look like a bar.



For anyone interested in the boring details, I have more build-along photos and commentary
here and here.

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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 269
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 2017-06-08 12:40 pm   Permalink

Incremental progress to share. For an array of reasons, I've decided to go with bamboo tambour panels for the wall. I liked the tortoise shell pattern, so went with that. In the process, I realized it would look good to clad the back bar in this, "tying the aesthetic together," so to speak. I found out what so many of you probably already know, that bamboo in almost any form doesn't like to absorb penetrative weather protectant. I ended up coating the tambour in clear Flood. Although the panels are sheltered directly from the elements, humidity can be high around here and I learned from the speakers that reflected UV is a concern.



I took the cabinet doors off the back bar and applied Titebond III to the edges and filled in the rest with Titebond II. Then I spread it evenly, more or less, with a folded scrap of paper.



Next, I laid the cut-to-size tambour panel atop the glue. The glue started oozing up between the slats, so I wiped it away then laid down a covering of wax paper. Atop this I laid scrap boards, which I then clamped tightly for 24 hours to allow the glue to set. The wax paper worked nicely--the excess glue didn't stick to it, and I was able to rub away the dried excess easily with my fingers.



Next, I needed handles for those cabinet doors. They're secured with magnet clasps, so they don't open easily. I'd harvested and torched some local bamboo back in December, and had it drying in the garage since then. I picked out some appropriately-sized pieces, used my band saw to cut to length and popped out the nodes. I marked and drilled holes where I thought the 2" bolts needed to go... maybe this is the point where I explain I really didn't know what I was doing? I had a vague notion how to make the handles, but having never done this before, wasn't sure it would work.

Regardless, I soon found that there was not enough clearance within the bamboo to insert the slender bolt through the hole. Hrm. Okay, so to address the problem I put the drill bit through the open node and enlarged the existing hole at an angle. Now I could slip those bolts into position!



I didn't want the bolt head tearing through the bamboo, though, so I added a washer for strength and durability. Alas, the bolt with the washer on it wouldn't fit through the node. I ended up slipping the washer in first, fishing the end of the bolt through it, then maneuvering the bolt into the hole. Not as simple as it sounds, with those darn washers skittering around inside the bamboo. But I eventually prevailed. Then repeated it five more times.



I cut a smaller piece of torched bamboo into 1/2 inch segments to sheath the bolt, then slipped the assembly through holes I'd marked and drilled through the cabinet doors. From the back side, I added a washer then tightened a nut on the bolt until the washer inside the handle bent into a shallow U shape.



Those handles, I'm happy to report, are pretty darn solid. They work well and look nicer than I expected. At some point I intend to seal off the holes in the handles at the nodes, otherwise I'll have mud daubers and spiders taking up residence. From prior experience, I've found that regular wood putty will crack when regularly stressed, so am not sure that'd be a good choice. I've used almond-colored silicone sealant to good effect, but it won't take a stain and won't be a close match for the color. What have other folks here used to seal up bamboo when needed?



As always, I've got a more detailed write-up
on my blog.

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mikehooker
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Jul 17, 2014
Posts: 917
From: Austin
Posted: 2017-06-08 1:26 pm   Permalink

Excellent work. Keep it up. The fine details like those bamboo handles are what elevate a bar from good to great.

 
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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 269
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 2017-06-08 2:11 pm   Permalink

Thank you, Mike! I'm unreasonably happy with those handles.

You know, despite untold hours reading through old threads in this Home Bar forum, I'm still making up a lot of this as I go. I've done a bit of woodwork in the past, but am finding bamboo is a different animal, so to speak. I've screwed up a few times along the way, but nothing I couldn't fix. Fingers crossed I don't botch things when real money's involved!


 
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VampiressRN
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Nov 23, 2006
Posts: 6153
From: Sun City Lincoln Hills (NorCal)
Posted: 2017-06-08 9:24 pm   Permalink

Great job!!! You are pretty handy with the glue and screwdriver. Love your process pictures. Can I have your pool please!!!
_________________
"Oh waiter, another cocktail please!!!"


 
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tikiskip
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Nov 26, 2005
Posts: 4535
Posted: 2017-06-09 6:52 pm   Permalink

“At some point I intend to seal off the holes in the handles at the nodes”

You know the best thing to do here is drill right down the center of the bamboo with say
A ½ inch drill bit then take a ½ inch dowel rod and glue it into the center of the bamboo.
This will fill that space in the center AND can help the bamboo not to crack.
At any rate it will make the handle have more strength.

“What have other folks here used to seal up bamboo when needed”
Other than a dowel rod I have used Wangi bamboo and made it stick through the front
Like the post part went right through the handle part.
That’s what I would have done here.

Burn it and let the crack go it is part of the rustic appeal I say.


 
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finky099
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 15, 2012
Posts: 505
From: Orange County, CA
Posted: 2017-06-09 8:28 pm   Permalink

Great work, Prikli! And I agree that those bamboo handles really are a great detail on the bar you're building. Impressive. The speakers came out great too. This is your first build out? Damn!
Cheers and here's to seeing more of your progress
Ryan


 
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tikiskip
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Nov 26, 2005
Posts: 4535
Posted: 2017-06-11 04:07 am   Permalink

You got the burn thing down and do a great job with that as well.

Some people go too far and it not so good.
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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 269
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 2017-06-11 8:49 pm   Permalink

VampiressRN, the pool is ours and going nowhere. The Wife will fight you for it! We really lucked into this place when we were home shopping a few years back. We actually looked at this place early on, just to get a feel for the market, and were gobsmacked by the pool, palms and overall tropical feel. But it was out of our price range. To make a long story short, we sold our old house and the house we had under contract fell through in the worst possible way. We were less than two weeks away from being homeless when the owners of this one lowered the price enough for us to make it work. So, yay to not being homeless! We weren't sure if having a pool would be a curse or a blessing, but the kids were super-excited. Nowaways, the kids hardly ever get in but Mom and Dad hit it every evening!

Ryan, thanks for the kind words! Yes, this is my first tiki bar build, but I've done wood work projects before, so it's not like I'm completely wet behind the ears. I've got zero experience working with bamboo prior to this, or designing thing to withstand exposure to the elements, insects, relentless onslaught of dust and dirt, etc. So yeah, pretty steep learning curve. The great thing is that I don't have to post photos of all my blunders!

Thanks for the tips, Skip! I'll see if I can retrofit a proper-sized dowel rod in there. Burning was interesting, as the first batch I didn't burn enough--just enough to change it from bright green-blue to olive drab. It wasn't until I got to work on my second harvest that I realized I'd not quite pushed it far enough. I built a hanging rack on the garage ceiling and have several dozen 8' culms aging up there now. I'd like to find a (free) source for thicker bamboo around here, but it all seems to be pretty much the same thing. Once I get the pergola installed (was supposed to be my big project this spring, but other priorities intervened) I'm going to add some clumping bamboo to the landscaping. But I won't be able to harvest any of that for some years to come. I have to say I've been reading your lamp-building threads with great interest. I've got a couple modest-scale projects in progress, and am taking cues from some of your work. So thanks for all the time you spent working up those how-tos. They're very helpful and appreciated.



 
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HaleTiki
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Mar 03, 2017
Posts: 25
Posted: 2017-06-11 9:55 pm   Permalink

Man you've really made a lot of progress since I stopped in. I'm loving all the work and the ingenuity of the spray painting on the speakers is really on point.
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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 269
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 2017-06-12 06:50 am   Permalink

Thanks, HaleTiki! The speakers really left me no choice--UV damage to the plastic casing was pretty extensive, so if I didn't cover it up in some fashion for protection, they'd have crumbled to dust in no time. But, you know, one thing leads to another, and before you know it a 30 minute repaint job leads to an evening spent applying masking tape with an exacto knife...

 
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