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Lagoon of Mystery
Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 284
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 2017-10-27 2:08 pm   Permalink

Quote:
On 2017-10-27 10:16, danlovestikis wrote:

I clicked on to see your latest post and got hooked because of all the great ideas. So I HAD to go back to page one and to look at each page again. This is the second time you have caught me. I love the shadows on the ceiling of the shark, turtle etc. How you jazzed up the fan was wonderful. Just so many great ideas. Wendy



That means a lot, coming from the "Queen of Creativity" Wendy! I wish I could take full credit, but I'm finding the space itself is influencing its direction and look as much, if not moreso, than I. There've been multiple times when I started out with one idea, but nope, the space resisted me until I came around to its point of view. If it weren't completely and totally inanimate, I might be in trouble!


 
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danlovestikis
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Jun 17, 2002
Posts: 7049
Posted: 2017-10-28 07:52 am   Permalink


We understand. We have collected so many tiki items that we can't do all the fun creative walls because they would just get covered up with more tiki things. I love see the matted walls and creative nooks and crannies. All I can say to you is Good Job in making a great space. Wendy
_________________


 
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mikehooker
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Jul 17, 2014
Posts: 917
From: Austin
Posted: 2017-10-28 11:16 am   Permalink

I appreciate your persistence. The light cover is a great touch.

 
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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 284
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 2017-10-30 10:41 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2017-10-28 11:16, mikehooker wrote:
I appreciate your persistence. The light cover is a great touch.


Sometimes it seems like persistence is all I've got. I suspect I could do some real damage with about $10,000 and a couple months off from work to devote to my tiki space, but as neither of those seem terribly likely, I'll have to content myself with chipping away around the edges. That is, if the Astros don't kill me with their extra-inning madness first!


 
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tikiskip
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Nov 26, 2005
Posts: 4568
Posted: 2017-10-30 1:31 pm   Permalink

"I fixed this by reaching into Skip's bag of tricks and applying a coat of amber shellac."

Looks good.
Next time just use the Jute over the whole basket, on the ring and the bamboo tie part.
It costs next to nothing and goes on easy, just takes time.

Burn, Elmer's glue, Shellac.
_________________


 
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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 284
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 28 days ago; 11:07 am   Permalink

When I started this whole tiki bar thing, I knew early on that I wanted one of those sign posts that listed a bunch of exotic destinations. Cliched? Sure. Cheesy? Maybe. But I finished it up this weekend and it makes me happier than really warranted.






Details and more photos may be found in my
blog entry.

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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 284
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 27 days ago; 07:50 am   Permalink

Time to bite the bullet. I've been avoiding that damn porthole window for the better part of a year because I knew it'd be a PITA to deal with. We thought the round window cool when we first moved in, but as I upgraded the patio, it looked shabbier and shabbier. Ideally, we'd have replaced it with an actual, for-real salvaged ship's porthole, but 1) the window's 31" across, which is HUGE for a porthole, 2) the few that exist are crazy expensive and 3) it'd be too heavy for the wall (at least for my comfort). So that left making one. Which I didn't want to do, because "cheap plywood painted in a half-assed attempt to look like metal" was the absolute last thing I wanted in my tiki bar.




I got a nice piece of 4'x4' oak plywood. That was my first mistake. I thought the hardness of the oak would be preferable to pine or spruce, but I hadn't counted on the aggressive grain of the oak. Some routers come with a circle-cutting attachment, but these are only good for small circles of less than 12" diameter. As you can see, I came up with a highly technical substitute.



The Wife is an excellent photographer. She can even make it look like I know what I'm doing. All that's missing is a Wile E. Coyote "Genius At Work" sign.



Another consequence of the hard oak--the router bit snagged and jumped repeatedly despite my best efforts, gouging sections of the wood. I have a hard time believing this would've happened with softwood.



I repaired the marred surfaces with basic wood putty. Had I been smart, I'd have coated the entire surface with the stuff. I'm not smart. As it was, the repaired sections sanded down nice and smooth, one of the few elements of this particular project that went as planned.



What's a porthole without rivets? A big wooden donut is what. To fake the rivets, I picked up several packets of 1" wooden mushroom buttons from Lowes. Then I marked the cardinal points on the wooden donut and drilled 1" holes in the center. Then I drilled four more holes at the quarter points. I'd hoped to stop there, but eight "rivets" looked sparse. I doubled it up, and finished with 16 rivet holes. That looked a lot better.



Then I started applying sanding sealer. I hadn't worked with sanding sealer for more than a decade, but I remembered it building up more quickly than this stuff did. The mushroom buttons smoothed out nicely, and I was able to paint them metallic brass early on. They looked good. The big wooden donut? Not so much. Apply sealer, sand, repeat. Over and over I did this, for several weeks. Some parts of the wooden donut got glossy smooth, which is what I wanted. Others, the grain stayed stubbornly visible. This became my personal Sysiphean stone. Ugh.



 
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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 284
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 27 days ago; 08:16 am   Permalink

With all that applying sealer and sanding, I had lots of downtime waiting for the coats to dry. So I started working on the center trim pieces, that separate the bamboo tambour wainscotting on the lower portion of the wall from the bamboo weave panels on the top portion. I pressed my complaining kids into service to hold the 1"x6" ponderosa pine boards in place as I centered the big wooden donut and marked the cuts I needed to make so everything would fit together.



Hey! Would you look at that! They match up nicely!



And I cut the crescent shape without any big screwups! Actually, a short time after this, I did screw up with the router and ruin these nice end cuts. Fortunately, I had enough excess board length that I was able to lop off the ruined section and re-cut the crescent. I took no photos of that incompetence.



Now, the fun begins. For my floor trim, I routered out simple, alternating triangle patterns. Nothing terribly complicated, and they turned out well. For the middle trim, though, because they'd be much more visible, I got the notion that I needed to mix things up with different designs. What can I say? I have more enthusiasm than sense. I worked up a variety of interchangeable designs and cut them out in cardstock stencils so I could reuse them. Then I spaced them out on the wood and traced the patterns. If you're thinking this was an insane amount of work, you'd be right.



But even that wasn't enough for me--I got the notion that I needed tiki faces in the trim as well. So I sketched out some on paper. These were too detailed to craft a stencil for (red flag right there, which I ignored) so I used my original drawing as a guide and added the pattern to the wood freehand.



This was too darn detailed for even a small trim router, so I had to break out the Dremel. That takes a lot longer, not even counting the time wasted changing out the different bits. I made plenty of screwups, but in the end I got the hang of it. Sort of.



Once I got all the ornamentation carved out, I hit the trim pieces with an angle grinder to nick and scuff them up to create the impression of wear and tear. Then I applied the butane torch to scorch it up.



More scorched trim.



Then I followed up with an aggressive application of the wire brush to remove the carbonized soot and leave the raised grain texture. Anyone else notice a pervasive burnt marshmallow odor when doing this? I'm assuming the sugars in the wood caramelize under the flame. It's a curious side effect. Once the wire brush was finished, I hit the trim with Minwax Special Walnut stain and several coats of spar urethane. Those steps were boring and no different from the way I'd done things earlier, so I didn't bother with photos.



 
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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 284
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 27 days ago; 08:57 am   Permalink

I eventually reached a point where I thought the big wooden donut had been sanded and sealed to the point where it was ready for painting. I thought wrong. Big sections of wood grain still showed through. What's worse, even without the wood grain, it looked like a piece of plywood painted to look like metal. To say I was not happy was an understatement. This was exactly what I'd feared would happen. So I started sanding. Sanding off the paint, the sanding sealer, the wood grain. I started with a power sander, and when that started damaging the wood, I hit the big, ugly wooden donut with elbow grease.





None of that addressed the squared, plywood look of the donut, tho. It was The Wife who suggested I bevel the edges to remove those sharp angles. Well, okay then. This was something I could do, and I even had the proper router bits for the job.



The metal window frame was also giving me problems at this time. The metal had been coated with this textured paint/resin compound that did a great job of collecting dust, and an even better job of not being removed. I couldn't just paint it metallic brass, because that'd look like I was just trying to cover the crap up in a half-assed manner. I used paint scrapers. I used utility knives. I used razor blades. Nothing really worked effectively. The curved surface of this frame and intersecting angles made it a challenge. Finally, a wet sanding sponge turned out to be the most effective tool. After a few hours, I finally had smooth metal.



I used painter's tape and newspaper to mask off the glass, and taped plastic sheeting everywhere else to catch overspray. About this time a cold front decided to blow through. Temperatures didn't drop much, but it got crazy windy. The plastic sheeting ripped away from the wall several times before I got it secure. I knew it wouldn't last the night, so I was determined to paint the metal that evening. I ended up watching the palm trees around our pool. Whenever they stopped whipping around, I knew there was a lull in the wind that would give me 10-15 seconds of spray time. So that's how I did it, grabbing those windows of opportunity every 5-10 minutes.



To cut a really, really, really long story short, I spent about two weeks reworking the big, ugly wooden donut. Instead of sanding sealer, this time I went with water-based spar urethane. It didn't build up as quickly as oil-based urethane, but 1) it dried more quickly and 2) was more paint-friendly. It built up better than the sanding sealer, so yay. So, when it came time to paint, I was understandably nervous. The good news: No wood grain was showing! The bad news: Brush strokes in the urethane were showing! Well, crap. Sometimes you just have to admit defeat and move on. The brush strokes weren't really visible from more than a few feet away, so most wouldn't ever notice (although I certainly do). The holes cut for the rivets worked perfectly for counter-sunk screws to attach it to the wall. I just held the porthole in place, drilled the pilot hole into the backing fiber cement siding, then drilled in the screw. Unfortunately, the paint and urethane had built up in the rivet holes, so that the wooden mushroom buttons wouldn't fit. I had to re-drill those. Then I tapped the rivets into place using a wooden mallet and a piece of belt leather covering the painted rivet, so as to not mar the metallic finish.



Here's a shot to compare with the starting image two posts up. The bevel and the fake rivets make a huge difference on the final aesthetic.



And here it is in the larger context. With the center trim and everything else in place. Hard to believe I've been working on this so long. Progress has been incremental, but keep at it long enough and it adds up.



As always, I have more images and step-by-step details on
my blog.

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Cap'n_Crafty_McGrim_II
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Dec 10, 2016
Posts: 41
From: New Orleans
Posted: 22 days ago; 1:47 pm   Permalink

I like coming over here and just looking, I always walk away with new ideas and inspiration.


 
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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 284
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 21 days ago; 10:28 am   Permalink

Why, thank you, Cap'n! I could say much the same about your build. I'm going to have to tackle our old deck pretty soon and am keeping an eye on your progress.

 
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tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 111
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 17 days ago; 3:51 pm   Permalink

Wow, Prikli, that porthole looks stellar! And I love how your trim is turning out. Keep posting, my friend. I'm living vicariously through your work until I find time to do more of my own!

 
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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 284
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 15 days ago; 8:28 pm   Permalink

Much appreciated, Tikitube! I'm at a point now where there's not going to be much new work worth posting for a while. I made another shade for the second ceiling fan light, and am working on a new trim piece for the next section. Nothing terribly ground breaking or different from what I've previously posted. Adding bamboo trim to the walls, touching up the ceiling paint, etc. Working at the margins, so to speak. I've got some interesting plans queued up, but probably won't have the cash to move forward until the spring (and my office remodel is only half-finished as well, and needs attention). Can you say "Spread too thin?" I can. But I'm happy the bar is in a place where it finally looks like a tiki bar, and our guests can see what my vision is for the rest of the covered patio.

 
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hang10tiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2010
Posts: 7387
From: Las Vegas
Posted: 14 days ago; 9:16 pm   Permalink

That came out great
Good job


 
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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 284
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 10 days ago; 08:46 am   Permalink

Thanks, Hang10tiki!

In other news, we had an incredibly rare snowfall last nigh. To put it in perspective, this is the biggest snow event I've experienced since 1973 or so. It's the first time my eldest has ever seen snow actually falling, and she's 19. Freezing precipitation around here, when it comes, usually takes the form of sleet or freezing rain. We get ice storms every few years. Snow is limited to a few stray flakes, and never sticks.





I did get the bananas, plumeria and bird of paradise covered, so yay!


 
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