FEATURES | MUSIC | BOOKS | DRINKS | FORUMS | GAMES | LINKS | ABOUT


advertise on Tiki Central

Celebrating classic and modern Polynesian Pop
  [Edit Profile]  [Edit Preferences]  [Search] [Sign Up]
[Personal Messages]  [Member List]  [Help/FAQ]  [Rules]  [Login]
Tiki Central Forums Home Tiki Bars Lanai at Windsong
Goto page ( 1 | 2 Next Page )
Lanai at Windsong
tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 72
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 2017-08-07 09:36 am   Permalink

Hello all! I'm finally getting around to starting my very own thread about our tiki room build. I've enjoyed seeing everyone else's projects, and have gotten some excellent ideas and advice reading about your experiences. Thanks for all the inspiration!

Our build is a bit different, in that it is a screened-in porch addition to our small, off-grid home. The style of our home is a hybrid of Craftsman, and Japanese, with a touch of Medieval/Tudor half-timbering. We designed it ourselves, and have been building it ourselves for over 6 years now. It's a never ending project!

Our home is small - about 500 square feet. We live off-grid, so air conditioning comes at a premium...we have to run the generator. Living in the Ozarks, summers can be brutal. The humidity is high, and it doesn't really cool off at night like in other climates. I *detest* sweating in bed. Trying to stay cool is challenging...there are only so many layers of clothing you can take off! So, we decided to build a screened-in porch off the side of our home. Not only will it be great for parties and lounging space, but we plan to also sleep in it on those hot summer nights, hopefully catching the breeze.

In addition to having enough space for two adults and two teenage kids to sleep, we also wanted to include a small bathroom, and room for a small washer and dryer (we've grown tired of using the laundromat). I also wanted a sunken seating area, with access to an old cistern buried below it, which we plan on outfitting as a storm shelter. We settled on a 12x16 footprint, which is tight, but won't visually overwhelm our small home.

The idea of making the addition a tiki styled room didn't occur to me until after we had already designed the floorplan and started the framing, but once it took hold, well you know how it goes! My wife didn't grow up with the same tiki experiences that I did, so she wasn't quite as "gung ho" about it at first. She was worried that the style wouldn't fit with the rest if our home...that the often cluttered "flotsam" look of traditional tiki would just look bad next to the clean lines of our home. So, I promised to do my best not to make it look too dated and/or cluttered. Working together on it, I think we are finding a good balance, while still tying it into the style of our home.

I've got photos of work that we've already done, and hope to continue to post progress pix as I find the time. Your feedback, and words of encouragement are always appreciated!

Mahalo!

- Jeff
_________________
tikitube


 
View Profile of tikitube Send a personal message to tikitube      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 72
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 2017-08-07 09:40 am   Permalink

In this photo, you can see the floor framing for our addition.





[ This Message was edited by: tikitube 2017-08-07 09:42 ]


 
View Profile of tikitube Send a personal message to tikitube      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 72
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 2017-08-07 09:47 am   Permalink

I would have liked to install a nice looking wooden patio door, but we didn't have the funds for it, so a cheap vinyl slider will have to do for now!






 
View Profile of tikitube Send a personal message to tikitube      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 72
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 2017-08-07 09:55 am   Permalink

Insulating and installing the subfloor!




Aaargh!! Rainstorm!!




Although we've had pretty good luck with Advantech subflooring not swelling too bad (except at the seams), we decided to go ahead and give it a couple coats of paint, for additional protection.





 
View Profile of tikitube Send a personal message to tikitube      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 72
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 2017-08-07 09:57 am   Permalink

First wall going up!



Framing the next wall...



Tiki addition starting to take shape!



Roof framing:



Housewrap and roofing:




Building awnings over the windows:



I picked up these old window sash frames at my local lumberyard during their "yard sale". No glass, so I thought I would use them as frames for the window screens:



Here's what they look like installed:



Framed and sheathed an area for the bathroom:



Window frames and awnings installed:



Trimming around the windows:








[ This Message was edited by: tikitube 2017-08-07 15:11 ]


 
View Profile of tikitube Send a personal message to tikitube      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 72
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 2017-08-07 3:24 pm   Permalink

Soooo...a tiki room has gotta have a tiki bar, right?

This was something that we hadn't really planned for in our original floorplan design, but once we decided on the tiki theme, I wanted to find a way to include space for a bar. Maybe not a full bar with me behind it, but at least a walk-up bar where guests could serve themselves. Seeing as I also didn't like the idea of the washer and dryer ruining the look of the room, I decided to build a tiki bar around the washing machine.

I saw this retro headboard on Craiglist for cheap...it's sorta tiki-ish looking. Maybe I can make it work.


First, I cut the legs short to get the correct height. Then I chopped it in half, and added some boards at the base for additional support, and to hide the washer.


I painted the backer boards black:


And, here it is installed, with the washing machine inside:


I will install a bar top lid on hinges and shelving for glassware on the wall behind it!

[ This Message was edited by: tikitube 2017-08-07 15:42 ]


 
View Profile of tikitube Send a personal message to tikitube      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 72
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 2017-08-07 3:37 pm   Permalink

Earlier I posted a pic of the bathroom. It basically looked like an ugly OSB box:


Here we are adding some trim to it:



And then for a family project, I had a bunch of cut-off remnants of cedar closet liner...small pieces maybe 4" long. We decided to use these as an accent border around the outside of the bathroom. I recruited my wife and kids to help me paint tapa-like designs on them:



Then I gave them a stain and polyurethane coating:


And here they are installed:



 
View Profile of tikitube Send a personal message to tikitube      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
HopeChest
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Oct 19, 2015
Posts: 243
From: East Bay, CA
Posted: 2017-08-07 5:15 pm   Permalink

This is SO awesome.

 
View Profile of HopeChest Send a personal message to HopeChest      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 72
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 2017-08-08 11:44 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2017-08-07 17:15, HopeChest wrote:
This is SO awesome.



Thanks!!


Thrilled to find this amazing mirror at Goodwill for only 10 bucks! We will use it in the bathroom, above the vanity. It's got black and tan braided leather and some intricately carved details along the outer edge. It needs a couple of repairs and some touch up paint, but what a killer deal. The woman at the checkout counter actually thanked me for buying it, as she said she was tired of moving it around the store.



I also picked up these instrument gauges for cheap. I realize they are more "nautical" theme than tiki, but we always like to have a thermometer hanging on the wall, so I figured I would try to incorporate them into the tiki room.




First things first, take them apart, tape them off, and give them a new paint job:


Then, build a custom frame for them to sit in:


Then I wrapped them in EPDM gasket material, and compression fit them into the holes:


Next up, our first roll of bamboo!! This will be used as wainscoting on the lower wall of the bathroom:


I didn't like the light tone, so I brushed on some "Polyshades" stain and polyurethane:


Then, I built a small ledge for them to sit on, same depth as the bamboo, and installed them:


[ This Message was edited by: tikitube 2017-08-08 12:08 ]


 
View Profile of tikitube Send a personal message to tikitube      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 180
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 2017-08-08 12:01 pm   Permalink

Tikitube, I have to say that looks fantastic! The new addition blends well, and looks like a natural extension of your existing home. The detail work is impressive--you got the family to help! That's something I've not quite managed with my build. That headboard is a terrific find, and you've put it to good use. What's more, those window screens look really smart the way you've installed them. If catching the passing breeze is the goal, I can't imagine a layout that'll do a better job. There's a reason pretty much every Southern home for the better part of the past 150 years have screened in porches!

 
View Profile of Prikli Pear Send a personal message to Prikli Pear  Goto the website of Prikli Pear     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 72
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 2017-08-08 12:15 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2017-08-08 12:01, Prikli Pear wrote:
Tikitube, I have to say that looks fantastic! The new addition blends well, and looks like a natural extension of your existing home. The detail work is impressive--you got the family to help! That's something I've not quite managed with my build. That headboard is a terrific find, and you've put it to good use. What's more, those window screens look really smart the way you've installed them. If catching the passing breeze is the goal, I can't imagine a layout that'll do a better job. There's a reason pretty much every Southern home for the better part of the past 150 years have screened in porches!



Hey, thanks so much! That means a lot coming from you, as I was super impressed with your Lagoon build photos! In fact, you did such an awesome job with that trim work that I went out and bought the same exact mini router you showed. I'm going to try my hand at a few carved trim pieces. I also found your bamboo handles and those painted speakers ingenius. Your DIY approach is superkewl and inspiring.


 
View Profile of tikitube Send a personal message to tikitube      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 180
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 2017-08-08 2:52 pm   Permalink

I was using that little trim router last night, and was reminded how hot it gets. With a cheap trim router like that, you don't want to over-tax it. The key is to make multiple shallow passes so the motor doesn't overwork itself and burn out. And I like to take a break every 5-10 minutes to let it rest a bit. I don't worry about that kind of thing with my big, two-handed Skil router, but then again, it doesn't ever get hot to the touch. I don't expect I'll ever use the trim router much once all my baseboards are done, so I couldn't really justify the expense of investing in a quality tool!

 
View Profile of Prikli Pear Send a personal message to Prikli Pear  Goto the website of Prikli Pear     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 72
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 2017-08-08 3:26 pm   Permalink

Great tip, thanks. I have even turned it on yet.

What kind of wood were you routing? I'm leaning towards cedar since it is pest/moisture resistant and was thinking that it might be easier on the router since it is so soft. Like you, a have a larger router - a porter cable- but I can't imagine trying to use it for anything super intricate.


 
View Profile of tikitube Send a personal message to tikitube      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 180
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 2017-08-09 06:58 am   Permalink

I initially planned to go with Western red cedar for its decay-resistant properties, but found some nice ponderosa pine boards that were significantly cheaper and had a far nicer finish to them. Since these trim pieces are protected from the elements, for the most part, I went with the pine. That may prove to be a mistake in the long run, but I'm hoping several coats of spar urethane says otherwise. So, yeah, that pine is pretty soft. When the cuts start leaving a shredded edge along the top of the groove (unsightly, but easily sanded away) your router bit is getting dull and needs to be sharpened or replaced. Just FYI.

Still not sure what I'll do with the cladding I plan to add to the vertical posts. They're at the edge of the covered area and get a lot of sun exposure and rain splash. Cedar's probably the way to go there, but it'll probably be winter or spring before I get to that stage.


 
View Profile of Prikli Pear Send a personal message to Prikli Pear  Goto the website of Prikli Pear     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 72
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 2017-08-09 9:30 pm   Permalink

A few more pictures...

Since we didn't decide on the tiki theme until we had already framed our addition, I realized too late that I would not have enough height to build the characteristic layered look of traditional tiki ceilings. I suspect that by the time you've got your matting and bamboo cross-members installed, you're dropping your ceiling height by at least 5 or 6 inches. Our ceiling is already low, but I was determined to find a way to add some layering without that much depth.

We settled on some lampac matting, which we mounted to thin luan plywood. You can see the white contact cement in this photo:


Again, I didn't like the light color of the raw material, so I then darkened it with a rub-on stain. I also sprayed it with some of that expensive fire retardant stuff, just in case:



Here is the first sheet installed on the ceiling. I just used deck screws with washers:


Then, we added a dark border around it, which also hides the screws:


And we installed diagonal bamboo fencing over that:


There will be a boxed edge around the bamboo that frames and divides it (visually) into sections. It also hides the metal pipe hangers that hold the bamboo in place, and will give me a recessed edge where I can tuck some LED rope lights. Overall, this drops the ceiling height by only about 2 inches, but still gives us the layered look we were wanting.

I'm also hoping to try my hand at carving some decorative pieces of trim to accent these boxed ceiling panels.

[ This Message was edited by: tikitube 2017-08-09 21:33 ]


 
View Profile of tikitube Send a personal message to tikitube      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Goto page ( 1 | 2 Next Page )
U-Moderate:
  
v1.5

[ About Tiki Central | Contact Tiki Central | Advertise on Tiki Central ]
(c) 2000-2017 Tikiroom.com (tm), Tiki Central (tm)

Credits & copyright infomation