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Tiki Central Forums Home Tiki Bars Lanai at Windsong
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Lanai at Windsong
Fugu
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Feb 06, 2006
Posts: 159
From: Atlanta, Georgia
Posted: 2017-08-10 7:56 pm   Permalink

Everything looks great so far! I really love that ceiling design. Very cool with the fencing over top.

 
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MadDogMike
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Mar 30, 2008
Posts: 8704
From: The Anvil of the Sun
Posted: 2017-08-11 11:20 am   Permalink

Nice TikiTube! Great start!


 
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tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 91
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 2017-08-12 8:43 pm   Permalink

Thanks!!

Here are a few more pix...

I saw a pair of old bamboo roll down shades at the local thrift store for $6, and decided to give them a new life as wall covering in our tiki bathroom. First, I removed the cord and measured them to fit horizontally across the walls. I applied black gaffer tape where I cut them to keep them from unraveling before I installed them on the wall.



Then, we installed some luan on the walls, for the contact cement to stick to:


Here are the shades stuck to the walls:


And then I added trim around them, and a tiki mask:



Next up, I picked up this inexpensive table at a second-hand store. It's got flowers that look a little like hibiscus, although the orange border feels a little Aztec to me. None-the-less, when I saw it I immediately thought that I might be able to make it work for the top of our tiki bar.


It has interesting legs, too:


Taking it apart:


It looks like one half of the table top will work as a bar top:



But first, we received a shipment of some bac-bac matting, so I switched gears to work with that! Like our lampac ceiling panels, I decided to first mount the matting to thin sheets of luan. As others have mentioned before, it was a challenge working with it, as it not very square. But I trimmed the edges and taped over them with gaffer tape. This will all get covered with trim, anyways.


And here are the first two sheets installed on the outside walls of the bathroom:


I'm digging this look!

- Jeff



 
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LoriLovesTiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 03, 2011
Posts: 1293
From: NJ
Posted: 2017-08-13 5:40 pm   Permalink

Looking good tikitube! Your build is looking fabulous! I haven't added anything to my tiki space in a while due to buying a second home but you're giving me the itch. Thanks for the inspiration.
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Lori


 
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tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 91
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 2017-08-14 12:49 am   Permalink

Thanks, Lori! Happy to oblige. Cheers!

Jeff


 
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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 224
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 2017-08-14 09:45 am   Permalink

You are excelling at repurposing found items and making them look classy as all get-out. Excellent work.

 
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tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 91
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 2017-08-16 05:45 am   Permalink

Thanks, Prikli!

Hoping to post some additional pix soon. We slept in there for the first time last night.


 
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tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 91
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 2017-08-18 2:46 pm   Permalink

Next phase...flooring! We decided on solid bamboo, as it should compliment the other natural materials and be relatively durable. The first step was to plane down the seams of the subfloor, and get a nice smooth surface. Although we did our best to cover everything with tarps before the roof was on, they still got wet and swelled a bit. After knocking down the ridges and cleaning up the shavings, the floor went down fairly quick and easy. I installed them with glue and blind-nailed the tongue where possible.






Then, I worked on the wall covering some more, and added a light switch cover. It was originally a golden oak and bright brass finish, so I toned it down and painted it to match the trim:


I also trimmed up the wall some more, including using some of the leftover flooring. The darker trim seams are caulked and need touch-up paint in this photo, but you get the idea...


Then, we ordered some of these bamboo strips on eBay. They were too light, so I immediately stained them:


We are using them for parts of the ceiling, as well as accent trim here and there. The hardest part of using them in this location was cutting the tiny pieces at the correct size/angle on the chop saw.


More to come...the humidity has been pretty unbearable these last couple of weeks, and it is making it difficult to do finish work with paints and stains. But I'm looking forward to our next part of this project...built-in seating!

Cheers,

Jeff


 
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tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 91
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 2017-08-28 8:14 pm   Permalink

The weather has cooled down quite a bit, and the humidity hasn't been as hellacious, allowing for more finish work in our tiki screened-in porch.

First, I finally got around to installing the top for our walk-up tiki bar. As I mentioned before, we didn't really have the space for a traditional tiki bar, so I decided to build one around the washing machine. I still have to build some shelves behind/around it for booze and glassware, but so far it works great and hides the washing machine well!



Our next big project was to frame the built-in seating. I planned for a "sunken" area that is a step down from the rest of the room, where we wanted a U-shaped row of benches for guest seating. (I've always been attracted to "sunken living rooms" since some of my friends' homes had them in the 70's.) Each bench would have a flip-up top with storage space underneath, which will be a blessing in our small home. I also framed some narrow shelves for resting drinks nearby, since we don't have space for a coffee table.

Here is the shelf that will run along the back of the seating facing south:


And here you can see most of the rough framing completed for the benches. They're not even done yet, and I'm already sticking a bunch of lumber and scrap wood underneath - hehe.


The bench tops are leftover tongue-and-groove cedar. I found some stainless steel hinges from a mobile home builder on eBay. I started adding painted trim to match the rest of the room and create continuous horizontal lines, which visually lengthens the perceived size of the space:


Next up, some tile backer board for the "drink rest" shelves:


First shelf with tiles and epoxy grout! The trapezoidal tiles have a bit of a MCM/atomic feel to them, which I love, but the color of the grout looks nothing like the dark brown it was supposed to be. Oh, well...it'll still work!


Next up, I convince my wife to use her mad sewing skills to create some cushions for the benches!


Thanks for looking,

Jeff


 
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MaukaHale
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 07, 2012
Posts: 744
From: The base of the Volcano
Posted: 2017-08-28 8:20 pm   Permalink

I'm looking forward to seeing the finished room. Its looking better with each new post.

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"People are like islands. You have to get close to them to know what they are about."
~ Adam Troy


 
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Prikli Pear
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jan 04, 2017
Posts: 224
From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted: 2017-08-29 09:56 am   Permalink

Really liking the way the tile and grout have come out. That's one type of home improvement I've never tried to tackle. The concept just scares me for some reason. But you're right, it just cries out MCM and the earth tones mesh well with your tiki aesthetic.

 
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tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 91
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 2017-08-31 9:06 pm   Permalink

Thanks! I only have a little experience with tile, but so far I've been fairly successful with it. Once you have the proper tools, it's not too difficult. I borrowed a tile saw from a friend. I use epoxy grout which is expensive and more difficult to work with, but it is nearly indestructible.

 
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tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 91
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 26 days ago; 12:24 pm   Permalink

Been working on other house projects for a bit, but managed to finish a few more parts of the Lanai.

First, we needed a door for the bathroom. Finding something "tiki" seemed like it would be impossible, so my first thought was to just find something older, with lots of character. The door will be on a sliding barn-door type track, so I wanted something made of solid wood. Unfortunately, people around here apparently think their old doors are very valuable. I didn't feel like spending $100 on an old door that I was going to have to refinish anyways. So...we decided to make one.

Now normally, I wouldn't dare to try building my own door. I'm on okay carpenter, but getting a homemade door to swing and close properly in a homemade jam frightens me. The *only* reason we even considered this option is because it will be hung on a track.

I decided to build the basic frame using a couple of 2x4 studs and some 2x6 scraps I had lying around. Then, I decided to fill the frame with wood from some old bed rails that I found lying in a trash heap on the curb in town.

Here are the raw materials:


Here's the frame, constructed using my pocket hole jig. If you've never used one of these before, I highly recommend them. They are pricey, but worth it, in my opinion. I used my router to make channels along the inside frame edges that the panels would sit in.


Here is the frame after some faux finishing (paint, more paint, stain, and poly):


And here it is with the panels going in. In addition to the bed rails that I cut down, I also cut up some old table extension leaves. Then, I had a small gap left so I stuck in a strip of yellow pine, just for contrast:


Here is the door hung on the sliding barn-door rails. I'm not thrilled with the horseshoe shape, but they were a good value and very heavy duty. I do have a plan to make them more "tiki" someday.


For the handle, I found this cheap little carved wooden flute on eBay:



In addition to the bathroom door, my wife worked ten hours sewing up cushions for the built-in seating. They turned out fantastic. We used 3" natural latex foam inside them, which we found marked down on eBay as "blems". I also ordered some more appropriate pillow covers. Those celtic knots will go away soon enough.



I can't wait to finish up the "bones" of the room and truly start the "decorating" phase, but at least now we have someplace comfortable to relax!

- Jeff
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tikitube


 
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tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 91
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 6 days ago; 11:18 am   Permalink

We've been super busy lately, so I just have a small update for now. We managed to tile the sunken seating area floor, and pour a small raised hearth in the center. We purchased a tiny wood stove that will go in the middle. It is very small - they call it the "Pipsqueak" - so it will be more for ambience than anything else, but should make the screened-in area more comfortable on slightly chilly days.

First, we put down some tile backer board:


Next up, framing the raised hearth area:


Here is the brown-toned mortar in the frame:


And with the frame removed! I could definitely use more practice in mortar work, but it will work...


Here are the tiles we settled on. Again, more of a MCM feel that reminds me of the Polynesian Resort or something. I got these tiles for SUPER cheap marked down by the clearance rack at Lowes:




 
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TabooDan
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 18, 2004
Posts: 662
From: Tiki in a Crowsnest, AB., Canada
Posted: 5 days ago; 8:27 pm   Permalink

That's awesome man!! Coming along real good!
I like watching this build as you're doing cool stuff and using what yah find or build not just buying.
Keep em coming.

TabooDan


 
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