FEATURES | MUSIC | BOOKS | DRINKS | FORUMS | GAMES | LINKS | ABOUT


advertise on Tiki Central

Celebrating classic and modern Polynesian Pop
  [Edit Profile]  [Edit Preferences]  [Search] [Sign Up]
[Personal Messages]  [Member List]  [Help/FAQ]  [Rules]  [Login]
Tiki Central Forums Tiki Drinks and Food Triple Old Fashioned?
Goto page ( 1 | 2 Next Page )
Triple Old Fashioned?
tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 79
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 2017-08-14 08:27 am   Permalink

So...I'm new to mixing tropical drinks, and bar terminology in general. I was reading an article about the different types of glasses used, and the author mentions a triple old fashioned glass, which he says hardly anyone uses "except tiki bars".

I have yet to see any drink recipes that call for such a glass. Do you all know of any, or is this just a mild stab at tiki bars for their reputation of serving stronger drinks?


 
View Profile of tikitube Send a personal message to tikitube      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
AceExplorer
Grand Member (6 years)  

Joined: Apr 03, 2008
Posts: 2159
From: Deep in the Jacksonville Florida jungle.
Posted: 2017-08-14 09:27 am   Permalink

Good question! I have yet to see an official "triple" glass in the wild, but would not be surprised that, by volume, we in the tiki world have drinkware which cold qualify as such. I can take a reasonable guess that the author's attribution to tiki is likely because a number of drinks in our genre and repertoire are quite voluminous from the standpoint of ounces served in a single drink. We have fruit juices and other flavorings in addition to the booze, and then ice, and sometimes fruit garnishes and fruit chunks to thank for that.

So, I'll try to answer with the following:
"Average sizes" I found in my books for Old Fashioned glasses are:

6-10 ounces for standard Old Fashioned glass.
12-16 ounces for double Old Fashioned glass.

Then, purely by extrapolating volumes from the two-glass pattern above, I'm guessing that 18-22 ounces is logical for a "triple Old Fashioned" glass. This may also approach or correspond to the capacities of various tiki mugs and snifters and other miscellaneous glassware we use to serve a single person.

Remember your last trip to the Mai-Kai? I think that the Mutiny, Hukilau, and Black Magic are served in good-sized snifters, but I don't know how many ounces. Looks can be VERY deceiving volume-wise with drinkware, so I'll take one further guess that a "triple Old Fashioned" glass may not adhere to the extrapolation above.

This is fun food for thought. Let's see what others here think about it and suggest. Cheers!



 
View Profile of AceExplorer Send a personal message to AceExplorer  Email AceExplorer     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
AceExplorer
Grand Member (6 years)  

Joined: Apr 03, 2008
Posts: 2159
From: Deep in the Jacksonville Florida jungle.
Posted: 2017-08-14 09:55 am   Permalink

More info came to light when I did some quick web searches and found that Triple Old Fashioned glasses are available, definitely hard to find, and pricey.

From Williams-Sonoma, the "Dorset" crystal glassware:
- Single: 7-oz. cap., 3 1/2" high. ($71.95 for four)
- Double: 11.5-oz. cap., 3 3/4" high. ($79.95 for four)
- Triple: 15.2-oz. cap., 4 1/4" high. ($119.95 for four)

From Restoration Hardware, the "Boulevard" cut crystal glassware, showing as no longer available:
- 3" diam., 4"H; 20 oz. (No price, sold in sets of two)

My estimated size of 18-22 oz was on target for one product with the triple at 20 oz, but not for the other which states their triple is 15.2 oz which lands it at the top of the "double" size range.

There's quite a bit of leeway with glassware volume, and I'm guessing that this is often the result of the design coming ahead of the finished glass volume. I have observed this with champagne saucers / coupes and with Nick & Nora glasses as well. Both are maddeningly inconsistent and constantly driving me to drink.

My conclusion is that you can substitute other glassware for the triple Old Fashioned. You need to know your drink volume, and then choose a different type of glassware to approximate a triple Old Fashioned. The wider and shorter your drink vessel is the closer you will come to approximating a real triple Old Fashioned. I would expect that a handful of "water" glasses may be considered as qualified substitutes if they have a somewhat short and squat appearance. Although, if too short and squat, such a large volume of liquid would be hard to hold, so I would expect triple old fashioneds to have a taller profile. Therefore the thought that a water glass or similar water tumbler could be considered an acceptable substitute.



 
View Profile of AceExplorer Send a personal message to AceExplorer  Email AceExplorer     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
lunavideogames
Grand Member (5 years)  

Joined: May 09, 2012
Posts: 1845
From: San Diego
Posted: 2017-08-15 1:41 pm   Permalink

I personally think the author of said article was wrong. Not sure which article but it seems like authors these days do not do enough research before writing about tiki, something they know nothing about.

Simple answer - I would be willing to bet large sums of money that the author meant "Double Old Fashoned" glasses. We in the tiki community use these as the industry standard for serving Mai Tais. I am positive that everyone who makes drinks at home has at least one on hand. I personally have about 50 from various tiki establishments.


A triple old fashoned would be like a pint glass, only beer drinkers use those. My 2 cents. Cheers.


 
View Profile of lunavideogames Send a personal message to lunavideogames      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 79
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 2017-08-15 2:10 pm   Permalink

Wow, thanks for the super thorough response, Ace!

I did some digging to try and find the original article again, as I was posting off of memory. I did find it again, and here's exactly what the author said: "A triple old fashioned glass exists and is used mostly in tiki bars, as far as I can tell.
"


 
View Profile of tikitube Send a personal message to tikitube      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 79
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 2017-08-15 2:10 pm   Permalink

Almost forgot... here's a link:
http://drinks.seriouseats.com/2011/03/cocktail-101-glassware-basics-different-types-of-cocktail-glasses.html

 View Profile of tikitube Send a personal message to tikitube      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
swizzle
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 03, 2007
Posts: 1168
From: Melbourne,Australia
Posted: 2017-08-15 7:25 pm   Permalink

I completely agree with you lunavideogames. I have well over 60 books on cocktails, from different eras, and i have NEVER seen a 'triple' old fashioned glass mentioned anywhere.

 
View Profile of swizzle Send a personal message to swizzle  Email swizzle     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
AceExplorer
Grand Member (6 years)  

Joined: Apr 03, 2008
Posts: 2159
From: Deep in the Jacksonville Florida jungle.
Posted: 2017-08-15 8:11 pm   Permalink

Yup, a TOF definitely seems rare and elusive! This gives us all a whole new angle from which to pursue thrifting in the loads of spare time we all have.

I still think that some tiki mugs *could* approximate the volume of a "triple old fashioned" glass. Earlier I gave some volume estimates as a potential basis for this reasoning. And a few web sites currently sell (or did sell) what they label as "triple old fashioned" glasses.

I did some more digging, cuz I just finished a couple nice drinks, and am testing my brain, and I found these fun and happy URLs:

Williams-Sonoma

Restoration Hardware

Replacements Ltd. (Replacements.com)

I noted again the high stated capacities of these - up to 20 ounces in the Restoration Hardware advert. And Williams-Sonoma provides options to look at single, double, and triple, as if they are some sort of "authority" on these. The Replacements Ltd. glass shown is listed with 19 ounces capacity.

There are variances in both capacities and terminology when it comes to glassware. Coupe glasses are a good example, mine vary quite a bit. While the author of the article may have been a bit casual / non-specific, I think a number of our tiki mugs approach or exceed 20 ounces capacity. But I think that a lot of our tiki mugs may be more properly considered a form of "highball" cylinder than any sort of Old Fashioned glass. This is why I say the author was a bit casual, non-specific, careless, etc. with that sentence. Using his approach, though, an empty Foster's can might qualify as a TOF.

It's certainly an interesting discussion. I searched and learned a few things. And someday when I see a TOF in the wild, I'll sell my grandmother to acquire it, then I'll take pictures of it and post them here. (Relax, it's ok, she's dead...)

I am officially announcing a new happy fun personal innovation -- my invention and naming of a QUADRUPLE Old Fashioned glass. It shall colloquially be called a "QOF" and may be pronounced "quoof" or "queef" depending on level of sobriety. Neener, neener! However, it is possible that Foster's may have already beaten me to it if you were to remove the top of their "oil can." A Foster's can holds 24.5 ounces, I think. This might fit nicely into the Quad Old Fashioned capacity classification which I'm hard at work inventing next...

Time for another !

(Edited to fix URLs with better/corrected BBcode)

[ This Message was edited by: AceExplorer 2017-08-15 20:25 ]


 View Profile of AceExplorer Send a personal message to AceExplorer  Email AceExplorer     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 79
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 2017-08-15 8:53 pm   Permalink

Well, I certainly appreciate your diligence and research. Although I'm new to this experience, I too shall keep my eyes peeled for a TOF, if for nothing else than to post a pic here and show off my thrifting savvy.

Cheers, indeed!


 
View Profile of tikitube Send a personal message to tikitube      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 79
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 2017-08-15 8:55 pm   Permalink

Oh. And this might double as your QOF:
http://www.williams-sonoma.com/m/products/dorset-crystal-ice-bucket/?cm_src=YMAN

[ This Message was edited by: tikitube 2017-08-15 20:56 ]


 View Profile of tikitube Send a personal message to tikitube      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
AceExplorer
Grand Member (6 years)  

Joined: Apr 03, 2008
Posts: 2159
From: Deep in the Jacksonville Florida jungle.
Posted: 2017-08-15 9:03 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2017-08-15 20:55, tikitube wrote:
Oh. And this might double as your QOF:
http://www.williams-sonoma.com/m/products/dorset-crystal-ice-bucket/?cm_src=YMAN



Very nice, LOL!!!!!


 
View Profile of AceExplorer Send a personal message to AceExplorer  Email AceExplorer     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
swizzle
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 03, 2007
Posts: 1168
From: Melbourne,Australia
Posted: 2017-08-16 02:45 am   Permalink

The three companies to the links you provided Ace have done nothing but take a product in their existing range, increased the volume of it, and then made up their own name for it. It's not a new category of glass type so the 'best' name for it they could come up with is a variation of the original.

It's like taking a Collins or Highball glass and making a larger version of it. What do you call it? Have you invented an entire new category? Of course not. So what do you do? Come up with some stupid name is what. An 'Extra' Collins, or a 'Higher' Highball.

It's funny how a website dedicated to a specific topic/theme, which has been around for 80ish years, is just hearing about 'triple' old fashioned glasses, especially considering they are used mostly in Tiki bars.

[ This Message was edited by: swizzle 2017-08-16 02:53 ]


 
View Profile of swizzle Send a personal message to swizzle  Email swizzle     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
AceExplorer
Grand Member (6 years)  

Joined: Apr 03, 2008
Posts: 2159
From: Deep in the Jacksonville Florida jungle.
Posted: 2017-08-16 03:54 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2017-08-16 02:45, swizzle wrote:
The three companies to the links you provided Ace have done nothing but take a product in their existing range, increased the volume of it, and then made up their own name for it. It's not a new category of glass type so the 'best' name for it they could come up with is a variation of the original.



swizzle, that makes sense, I'm following you. Based on the stated higher liquid volumes, it makes sense to differentiate as long as the volumes follow a logical pattern. This really causes me to wonder -- when is it a highball glass instead of a TOF? If the glass design were to be unwieldy in our hands, then a taller and more cylindrical design is more desirable. And that's a highball.

You made me wonder if I'm actually defending the thing versus just musing out loud. I started looking at this purely out of curiosity, and my goal was the latter, don't know how I'm coming across. But if the concept of a TOF is in fact in use out there, which it just barely seems to be in some remote corners of the interwebs and definitely NOT in the tiki community, my position is that the makers, sellers, users, etc. ought to dang well stick to logically although somewhat rough "standard" sizes for each. Or just call it a Highball if that's what it really is. It would be a shame to see the "coupe-ification" of Old Fashioned glassware, although there is already quite a bit of variation out there. So I kind of hope this remains a background issue. But if not, I think we've got some interesting discussion in this thread.


 
View Profile of AceExplorer Send a personal message to AceExplorer  Email AceExplorer     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 79
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 2017-08-16 05:42 am   Permalink

Yep, standards are always a good thing when it comes to sizes!

Regarding the TOF versus highball, doesn't the old fashioned design offer some benefit for "rocks" drinks that a Collins or highball would not, thereby necessitating the existence of a TOF glass IF it called for that much volume AND rocks? Or would the volume of said drink by its very nature render the rocks ineffectual?

Again, just thinking out loud. Is there a drink on the rocks of that volume? Doesn't sound like it here, at least from a tiki bar perspective. Or is this more of a marketing ploy for disgruntled workers who drop by the bar after work and say, "Tough day at the office...better make it a triple, Sam."

I can see it now...The Triple Old Fashioned...for those (luckily) rare occasions when a double won't quite cure your ills.


 
View Profile of tikitube Send a personal message to tikitube      Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
swizzle
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 03, 2007
Posts: 1168
From: Melbourne,Australia
Posted: 2017-08-16 06:31 am   Permalink

Well to me you definitely seem to come across as defending it. Who in hell orders a double of ANYTHING besides a nip of spirits???

"Bartender, could you please make me a double Mai Tai?". "Bartender, could i please have a double Cosmopolitan?". Bartender, give me a double beer?". " You mean a larger glass???". "Yeah".

The old fashioned glass is named so because of the drink. I have no idea where, or why, a double old fashioned glass came from or exists, but regardless, it does and it is the perfect size for a Mai Tai. Technically it's not a Mai Tai glass at all, it's a double old fashioned which happens to fit a Mai Tai perfectly. But no-one asks for a Mai Tai and a half!!!





 
View Profile of swizzle Send a personal message to swizzle  Email swizzle     Edit/Delete This Post Reply with quote
Goto page ( 1 | 2 Next Page )
U-Moderate:
  
v1.5

[ About Tiki Central | Contact Tiki Central | Advertise on Tiki Central ]
(c) 2000-2017 Tikiroom.com (tm), Tiki Central (tm)

Credits & copyright infomation