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Tiki Central Forums Tiki Drinks and Food What are you Drinking?
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What are you Drinking?
floratina
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 998
From: West Los Angeles
Posted: 2002-07-18 4:39 pm   Permalink

Woody - I like bitters. You know that cherry coke / Banana shnapps / rum thing I mentioned earlier on this thread? I neglected to mention that I add Angostura bitters to it, too.

 
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Tiki King
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 13, 2002
Posts: 548
From: Lush tropical Santa Cruz, CA.
Posted: 2002-07-18 5:42 pm   Permalink

Ahhh, The Negroni. We love 'em here at the 821, but it is an aquired taste. In fact on the bar menu, it says "you wont like it, but we do"

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[ This Message was edited by: Tiki King on 2002-07-18 17:43 ]


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Cherry Capri
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 24, 2002
Posts: 238
From: an uncharted desert isle
Posted: 2002-07-18 7:09 pm   Permalink

I like anything with a cherry garnish

 
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thejab
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 2986
From: Tradewinds Apartments, Alameda, CA
Posted: 2002-07-18 7:29 pm   Permalink

Have you tried Cherry Heering liqueur from Denmark? It's great in a Singapore Sling, on the rocks, or over ice cream! Don'r forget the cherry garnish.

Also a good liqueur to have around if you like making drinks from old recipe books is Maraschino Liqueur. It doesn't taste like maraschino cherries because it's made from Marasca cherries in Italy, that are somewhat sour. Try a martini with a little maraschino instead of vermouth (or half and half). There are Luxardo and Marasca brands at the local Beverages and More.
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stentiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 24, 2002
Posts: 892
From: Huntington Beach
Posted: 2002-07-18 7:30 pm   Permalink



[ This Message was edited by: stentiki on 2004-04-23 16:07 ]


 
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stentiki
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 24, 2002
Posts: 892
From: Huntington Beach
Posted: 2002-07-18 7:32 pm   Permalink



[ This Message was edited by: stentiki on 2004-04-23 16:08 ]


 
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manic cat
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jun 21, 2002
Posts: 540
From: East Village, NYC
Posted: 2002-07-19 12:40 pm   Permalink

There's was rum and hard cider at home last night, so I tried the Stonewall. (But a variation because it was light rum and cranberry-apple cider) Supposedly, not true to form, but it was very nice. Thanks for the inspiration.

 
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TikiMaxton
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 557
From: Portland, OR
Posted: 2002-07-19 12:50 pm   Permalink

I tend to think of the stonewall as a wintertime drink, but for no other reason than that was the first time I had it. It was in an 1820s tavern (no electric lights, wait staff in period costume, period food and drink without all the pesky disentery) at Greenfield Village in Detroit. A rainy November day, and we were the only ones in the place. Burned a jones for that ancient drink right into my brain. Try it sometime with the authentic ingredients - it really tastes like something your great great great grand alcoholic woulda liked...

 
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tiki.head
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Jun 07, 2002
Posts: 92
From: Medford, NJ
Posted: 2002-07-21 11:50 am   Permalink

A Caipirinha,
Juice of 1/2 Lime
Teaspoon sugar
3 ounces Aguardente (Pinga) (sugar cane alcohol)
Serve over cracked ice.
A nice summer drink, but not too many of these, now.


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rch427
Tiki Centralite

Joined: May 14, 2002
Posts: 29
From: San Francisco
Posted: 2002-07-22 3:51 pm   Permalink

If you like bitter cocktails...

Anyone tried Cynar? It's similar to Campari or other red vermouth-type aperitifs, but with extract of artichoke in it. It tastes pretty much like you think it would, and I've become fond of mixing two parts of it with one part London dry gin, over ice.

My other main discovery, here in the Netherlands, is oude genever. It is to London dry gin what an Islay single malt scotch is to cheap, blended scotch. It has the juniper (and other) extracts, but the grain is much more emphasized, and it has a much more caramelized feel in the mouth. It's good enough to drink straight or on the rocks. If you have access to proper Dutch oude genever, I highly recommend it.


 
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Trader Woody
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 2301
From: Tiki Manor, Forest of Bowland,UK
Posted: 2002-07-23 07:57 am   Permalink

I've been curious about Cynar ever since I saw a bottle with it's distinctive label featuring
an artichoke. (Only those weird Chinese spirits with dead snakes/lizards etc. are more off-putting)
Recently, I read an article about the stuff, saying that it really deserved to be a lot more
popular & that they just don't know how to market it. So, it's now on my shopping list.

We became very enamoured of a couple of Genever tasting houses in Amsterdam, particularly
the custom of bending over and sipping the stuff so as not to spill a drop. It also seemed to go
down well accompanied by a plate of oude Gouda (aged cheese) & the local beer at the pub near
our hotel. I must admit to preferring a dry London gin martini, though!

Tradr Woody


 
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thejab
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 2986
From: Tradewinds Apartments, Alameda, CA
Posted: 2002-07-25 12:24 pm   Permalink

Last weekend while exploring small towns in the mountains of California, we stopped at a bar in Susanville called the Roundup Room. They specialize in a drink called a Picon Punch. It was delicious and refreshing so I bought the ingredients and made a couple last night. Here's the recipe:

Picon Punch
2 oz. Amer Picon (a bittersweet french apertif that is also made domestically in San Jose)
1/2 - 1 teaspoon grenadine (I prefer 1 teaspoon)
1/2 oz. cognac or brandy
add lots of cracked ice and the above ingredients to a 6 oz. highball glass, fill with soda water, float cognac, add lemon twist

Makes a great before-dinner drink.

I love discovering old bars in small towns that have specialty cocktails. The specialty drink is often made perfectly because they make so many. One such bar is Poor Red's BBQ in El Dorado, CA, just south of Placerville. They specialize in the Golden Cadillac. It is said that they use more Galliano at that bar than anywhere else in the world. It's kinda funny to look around when you're there and see all these tough looking guys drinking creamy drinks from saucer champagne glasses!

Golden Cadillac
1 oz. Galliano
3/4 oz. White Creme de Cacoa
Cream or Ice Cream

Shake with Cream & ice, Strain to serve up, or Omit ice & Blend with Ice cream for Frozen variation


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Alnshely
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 24, 2002
Posts: 974
From: Oceanside CA
Posted: 2002-07-27 9:32 pm   Permalink


Pineapple Paradise
(From "Intoxica" by Jeff Berry)
4 OZ Unsweetened Pineapple Juice
1 OZ Fresh Lime Juice
1 OZ Peach Brandy
1 1/2 OZ Demarara Rum
1 OZ Puerto Rican Rum
1 Teaspoon sugar
Dissolve sugar in lime juice.
then shake all ingredients with scoop of crushed ice. Serve in a hollowed out pineapple.
This is good, strong not too sweet.
Al


 
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PiPhiRho
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 1017
From: Redondo Beach
Posted: 2002-08-01 9:21 pm   Permalink

I have my own versions of some of the well known cocktails hat I have been enjoying recently. The main three are Mojitos, Mai Tais and Suffering Bastards. The secret to a Mojito is the mint you use and how you crush it. I also use two rums in my Mojitos: a white rum and a little of a darker rum, either Barbancourt or Pusser's Blue label. Other than that, the Mojito is pretty standard.

For Mai Tai's I use the Trader Vic's mix, but I don't follow the recipe on the label. I find that makes a mai tai that is too tart and doesn't taste like the drink in the restaurant. But, I found a way to make the Mai Tai taste as good as the restaurant and maybe better, using the mix with a little doctoring.

Fill a 16 Oz rocks glass with crushed ice. Add...

Juice of 1 whole fresh lime,
approx. 1 teaspoon each Rock Candy and Orgeat syrups,
2 or 3 shakes Fee Bros. Orange Bitters,
2 Oz Noa Noa Tahitian Rum,
fill glass up with Trader Vic's Mai Tai mix, leaving about 1/2 inch or so space from top.
Fill the rest of the way with dark rum (Myer's).
Stir and garnish with mint. The color is a little greener than in the restaurant, but the taste comes pretty close.

For my Suffering Bastard I use a recipe that is somewhere between the Grog Log version and the Tiki-Ti version.

Use a double Rocks glass or a 16 oz High Ball glass. Over is add...

juice of 1 lime (or a mix of lime juice and Rose's),
2 shakes Peychaud's bitter, 1 shake Angostura,
1 tablesspoon Orgeat syrup.
2 Oz white rum
1 oz bourbon
fill glass to top with ginger ale

Garnish with mint and cherry.

I find these work pretty well.



 
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Thorinsummer
Member

Joined: Jun 10, 2002
Posts: 4
From: Seattle
Posted: 2002-08-01 9:47 pm   Permalink

Tonight I am having a drink from my copy of Bar Guide (Published by True, The Man's Magazine, 1953 printing). It's a great old guide I inherited from my dad. Illustrated with cartoons by Vip.

TAHITIAN HONEY BEE

1/2 oz. Lemon Juice
1 tsp. Honey
1 jigger Puerto Rican Rum

Mix honey with lemon juice in shaker. Add rum and shake with cracked ice and strain. Serve with twist of lemon peel.


 
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