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Unpopular Tiki Opinions
Iolani
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Sep 30, 2003
Posts: 99
Posted: 2018-08-23 6:34 pm   Permalink

Quote:

If we love tiki so much, and tropical paradises, why not go to one of the sources more often?



Because I'm poor, perhaps?


 
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Cammo
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 18, 2006
Posts: 2032
From: San Diego
Posted: 2018-08-23 9:21 pm   Permalink

Recent Tiki History

1959 Adventures in Paradise TV show premiers.

1959 Hawaiian Eye TV show premiers.

1964 Gilligan’s Island TV show premiers.

1966 Boyd Rice wears a cheap Robert Hall Hawaiian Shirt and the Tiki Necklace sold with it to elementary school. His favorite TV show at this time is Hawaiian Eye, already in reruns. He is part of a huge group of imaginative, often West Coast baby boomers who were more interested in Tikis and Hawaii than the Hippie Beatle Drug shenanigans just starting to explode nationally.

1968 The Hawaii Five-0 TV show premiers.

1969 Retro rockers Sha-Na-Na play 'Teen Angel' before Jimi Hendrix goes on the stage at Woodstock.

1969 Arthur Lyman and his Combo continue playing live in Honolulu.

1973 American Graffiti movie is released. Retro is now cool; a PG rating ensures that younger kids just coming of age pack the seats. They like the music.

1973 American Graffiti double-LP set goes triple platinum. Classic ultra-hip mood music like Green Onions and The Stroll blows boomer’s minds when played on 1970’s stereo sets with killer speakers turned ALL the way up.

1975 English group ‘Throbbing Gristle’ formed, coining the term Industrial Music. They used Nazi imagery, pornography, glaring lights and clashing noise in their performances. Their last show was in 1981, in San Francisco. Classic Exotica was played at the end of their concerts, partly just to cool the audience down so no riots would take place.

STAY TUNED KIDS...


 
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tikiskip
Grand Member (8 years)  

Joined: Nov 26, 2005
Posts: 5012
Posted: 2018-08-24 06:51 am   Permalink

Would the Brady Bunch episode with the cursed tiki be in there somewhere?

 
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Cammo
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 18, 2006
Posts: 2032
From: San Diego
Posted: 2018-08-24 07:06 am   Permalink

Skip - you bet. It’s coming.
I don’t know why nobody’s done a list like this before here on TC.


 
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HopeChest
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Oct 19, 2015
Posts: 399
From: East Bay, CA
Posted: 2018-08-24 10:19 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2018-08-24 06:51, tikiskip wrote:
Would the Brady Bunch episode with the cursed tiki be in there somewhere?



Hell, you could make a good argument that there are loads of folks whose first exposure to / knowledge of "tiki" comes from that very episode.


 
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Cammo
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 18, 2006
Posts: 2032
From: San Diego
Posted: 2018-08-24 10:35 am   Permalink

It's fascinating how a LOT of stuff happened in the first 5 years after Hawaii statehood. You wonder if even surf culture was part of Hawaii obsession, or the other way around inside out.

Recent Tiki History

1951 Les Baxter’s The Quiet Village song is released on an unsuspecting public. Oddly it is about a village in Africa, not Hawaii.

1957 Martin Denny releases his version of Les Baxter’s Quiet Village song. By 1959 it reaches number 4 on the pop charts, making even Elvis Presley a bit nervous.

1959 Hawaii becomes a state. The country goes wild for anything Polynesian.

1959 Adventures in Paradise TV show premiers.

1959 Hawaiian Eye TV show premiers.

1961 Elvis stars in Blue Hawaii.

1961 The Beach Boys record Surfin’.

1962 The Trade Winds motel chain cracks open a few.

1963 Jan & Dean record Surf City

1963 The Tiki Tiki Tiki Tiki Tiki Room opens. Walt himself supervises all the details, including that not a single nail, electrical cord, screw or speaker wire shows anywhere inside. The rain effect, subtly moving Tiki poles and birds from the rafters are still astounding.

1963 The film Beach Party opens to an appreciative audience.

1964 The Ilikai opens; the first ultra-modern high rise hotel on Waikiki beach. It’s the one Jack Lord smiles from the top of. A frantic land grab starts and Honolulu tourism skyrockets.

1964 Gilligan’s Island TV show premiers.

1966 Boyd Rice wears a cheap Robert Hall Hawaiian Shirt and the Tiki Necklace sold with it to elementary school. His favorite TV show at this time is Hawaiian Eye, already in reruns. He is part of a huge group of imaginative, often West Coast baby boomers who were more interested in Tikis and Hawaii than the Hippie Beatle Drug shenanigans just starting to explode nationally.

1967 I Dream of Jeannie visits Waikiki for real, visits Duke’s, stays at the Ilikai and hangs out with Don Ho.

1968 The Hawaii Five-0 TV show premiers.

1969 Retro rockers Sha-Na-Na play Teen Angel before Jimi Hendrix goes on the stage at Woodstock.

1969 Arthur Lyman and his Combo continue playing live in Honolulu.

1971 Disneyworld’s Polynesian Village opens for business.

1972 Oahu’s North Shore surfing gets real popular with Californian surfers.

1972 The Brady Bunch visits Waikiki for real; Greg gets cursed, tanned and shows off on his shortboard. Mr. Brady throws back a few tall ones with Florence. The girls learn to hula. The entire nation feels like they just visited Hawaii.

1973 American Graffiti movie is released. Retro is now cool; a PG rating ensures that younger kids just coming of age pack the seats.

1973 American Graffiti 2-LP set goes triple platinum. Classic retro mood music like Green Onions and The Stroll blows boomer’s minds when played on early 1970’s stereo sets with killer speakers turned ALL the way up.

1975 English group ‘Throbbing Gristle’ formed, coining the term Industrial Music. They used Nazi imagery, pornography, glaring lights and clashing noise in their performances. Their last show was in 1981, in San Francisco. Classic Exotica was played at the end of their concerts, partly just to cool the audience down so no riots would take place.


 
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Hakalugi
Site Administrator

Joined: Aug 10, 2004
Posts: 3452
From: Redondo Beach, CA
Posted: 2018-08-24 12:21 pm   Permalink

I just wanted to see these side by side...





 
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HopeChest
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Oct 19, 2015
Posts: 399
From: East Bay, CA
Posted: 2018-08-24 12:48 pm   Permalink

Quote:

On 2018-08-24 12:21, Hakalugi wrote:
I just wanted to see these side by side...






Seeing that is inordinately satisfying.


 
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Cammo
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 18, 2006
Posts: 2032
From: San Diego
Posted: 2018-08-25 10:06 am   Permalink

Recent Tiki History

1951 Les Baxter’s The Quiet Village song is released on an unsuspecting public. Oddly it is about a village in Africa, not Hawaii.

1957 Martin Denny releases his version of Les Baxter’s Quiet Village song. By 1959 it reaches number 4 on the pop charts, making Elvis Presley a bit nervous.

1959 Hawaii becomes a state. The country goes wild for anything Polynesian.

1959 Adventures in Paradise TV show premiers.

1959 Hawaiian Eye TV show premiers.

1961 Elvis stars in Blue Hawaii.

1961 The Beach Boys record Surfin’.

1962 The Trade Winds motel chain cracks open a few.

1963 Jan & Dean record Surf City

1963 The Tiki Tiki Tiki Tiki Tiki Room opens. Walt himself supervises all the details, including that not a single nail, electrical cord, screw or speaker wire shows anywhere inside. The rain effect, subtly moving Tiki poles and birds from the rafters are still astounding.

1963 The film Beach Party opens to an appreciative audience.

1964 The Ilikai opens; the first ultra-modern high rise hotel on Waikiki beach. It’s the one Jack Lord smiles from the top of. A frantic land grab starts and Honolulu tourism skyrockets.

1964 Gilligan’s Island TV show premiers.

1966 Boyd Rice wears a cheap Robert Hall Hawaiian Shirt and the Tiki Necklace sold with it to elementary school. His favorite TV show at this time is Hawaiian Eye, already in reruns. He is part of a huge group of imaginative, often West Coast baby boomers who were more interested in Tikis and Hawaii than the Hippie Beatle Drug shenanigans just starting to explode nationally.

1967 I Dream of Jeannie visits Waikiki for real, visits Duke’s, stays at the Ilikai and hangs out with Don Ho.

1968 The Hawaii Five-0 TV show premiers.

1969 Retro rockers Sha-Na-Na play Teen Angel before Jimi Hendrix goes on the stage at Woodstock.

1969 Arthur Lyman and his Combo continue playing live in Honolulu.

1971 Disneyworld’s Polynesian Village opens for business. Restaurants and bars in the Orlando area stock a LOT more Tiki Mugs, as does the Village itself.

1972 Oahu’s North Shore surfing gets real popular with Californian surfers.

1972 The Brady Bunch visits Waikiki for real; Greg gets cursed, tanned and shows off on his shortboard. Mr. Brady throws back a few tall ones with Florence. The girls learn to hula. The entire nation feels like they just visited Hawaii.

1973 American Graffiti movie is released. Retro is now cool; a PG rating ensures that younger kids just coming of age pack the seats.

1973 American Graffiti 2-LP set goes triple platinum. Classic retro mood music like Green Onions and The Stroll blows boomer’s minds when played on early 1970’s stereo sets with killer speakers turned ALL the way up.

1975 English group ‘Throbbing Gristle’ formed, coining the term Industrial Music. They used Nazi imagery, pornography, glaring lights and clashing noise in their performances. Their last show was in 1981, in San Francisco. Classic Exotica was played at the end of their concerts, partly just to cool the audience down so no riots would take place.

1976 Boyd Rice first listens to Martin Denny albums given to him by a biker friend of his father’s. He starts collecting Martin Denny records around this time.

1978 Grease hits movie screens and the whole world goes nutzo over Olivia and John singing pseudo-50’s songs and dancing in penny loafers and white socks. Japan starts dressing in fluffy dresses and greasing their thick black hair. Even Michael Jackson sits up and takes notice, borrowing the Ravoltish dance moves for the rest of his career...

1978 Boyd Rice sees English group Throbbing Gristle for the first time in London.

1978 Boyd Rice goes to Kelbo’s for the first time. He has a drink that arrives in a skull shaped mug. On fire.

1979 Arthur Lyman and his Combo continue to play at the New Otani in Honolulu.


 
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MrFab
Tiki Centralite

Joined: Oct 14, 2004
Posts: 77
From: Van Nuys, CA
Posted: 2018-08-25 11:41 am   Permalink

Shaping up to be a great list, Cammo. Couple thoughts:

Wasn't the North Shore popular long before 1972? Waimea Bay pops up in surf rock lyrics in the early '60s.

I thought Michael Jackson got his 'moonwalk' moves from James Brown. Unless 'Grease' inspired different dances from MJ.

Gotta add "Kon Tiki" and "(Tales of the) South Pacific." Or is the '40s not recent enough?

[ This Message was edited by: MrFab 2018-08-25 11:42 ]

[ This Message was edited by: MrFab 2018-08-25 11:48 ]


 
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Cammo
Tiki Socialite

Joined: May 18, 2006
Posts: 2032
From: San Diego
Posted: 2018-08-25 12:29 pm   Permalink

"Wasn't the North Shore popular long before 1972?"

Check out the history of it - locals wouldn't let mainlanders surf the North Shore until the very early 70's. The battle for the North Shore changed surfing forever.

"I thought Michael Jackson got his 'moonwalk' moves from James Brown. Unless 'Grease' inspired different dances from MJ."

I think he got the moonwalk from WAY before James Brown, and the rest from Grease; leather jacket, pennyloafers, white socks, on the toes poses, silhouette moves. Check out the Grease dances, they're amazing.

"Gotta add Kon Tiki and Tales of the South Pacific."

Then I'd have to go back to Melville's Typee, which truly started it all.
And I really think people read too much into Mitchener; South Pacific is just a bunch of pub tales he heard down there.

This list is really about the supposed "rediscovery" of Tiki, which looks more and more like a myth to me as the list fills out.


 
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tikitube
Grand Member (first year)  

Joined: Apr 25, 2017
Posts: 279
From: Ozark Underwater Cliffs
Posted: 2018-08-30 08:16 am   Permalink

I was heavily into the industrial scene in my youth, but never connected that with tiki. I did have (might still have) TGs Greatest hits on cassette, and it never registered as tiki influenced.

That being said, my interest in tiki and industrial music grew independently of each other.

What's more interesting is that those of us who were into industrial were sorta anti-fad and anti-pop culture, so it's ironic to me that we find ourselves in this stereotype of "riverheads turned tikiphiles". The more it changes, the more we stay the same...

[ This Message was edited by: tikitube 2018-08-30 08:18 ]


 
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HopeChest
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Oct 19, 2015
Posts: 399
From: East Bay, CA
Posted: 2018-08-30 10:30 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2018-08-30 08:16, tikitube wrote:

What's more interesting is that those of us who were into industrial were sorta anti-fad and anti-pop culture



I was really into industrial music as well and agree with this. The conscious rejection of that sort of stuff.

However, I also feel that, in whole, it describes a fairly particular and narrow slice of industrial fandom/fans, something like your stereotypical goths. While there were certainly a lot of folks who were rigidly like that, there was also a very tongue-in-cheek element of dark humour. I always thought it was hilarious that TG went as far as to dedicate that record to Martin Denny. When TG came out, I don't think there was anything less cool than exotica music - they were yer grandparents' records. So it still ran very much against the grain, playing those records after gigs and doing era-correct photo shoots. And going against the grain was the essence of Throbbing Gristle.

I've always felt that approach was one of the gateways that brought the punks to tiki.



 
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Jeff Central
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 23, 2002
Posts: 1700
From: Columbus, Ohio
Posted: 2018-08-30 10:43 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2018-08-23 11:01, MrFab wrote:
Yeah, I think the back of that Throbbing Gristle album actually reads "Dedicated to Martin Denny." Wonder if Denny knew that, and what he thought of it!

Did TG make any actual exotica-inspired music?



YES!!! Look on the 20 Jazz Funk Greats album and the Journey Through a Body album. Both include electronic exotica tracks!! Quite good I may add!!


 
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Jeff Central
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Jul 23, 2002
Posts: 1700
From: Columbus, Ohio
Posted: 2018-08-30 10:46 am   Permalink

Quote:

On 2018-08-23 11:46, AceExplorer wrote:
Quote:

On 2018-08-23 11:01, MrFab wrote:
Wonder if Denny knew that, and what he thought of it!



Your question is answered exactly and in detail here on the Telepathica web site. For posterity, this is the text of that page, and it relates clearly that Martin Denny was made aware but wasn't sure how to take it:

(Unbeknownst to me, in 1989, Genesis P-Orridge sent a record I made with his daugher Caresse P-Orridge called, "R.U. Xperienced?" to Mr. Martin Denny.
This is what happened.)

Attached is a foto of what he sent me which reads as follows:

August 1, 1989

Turning Shrines
P.O.Box 337
Boston, MA 02180

Dear Sirs,
Just recently I received a LP addressed to me from Brighton England entitled "R.U. Xperienced?" I am curious as to who may have sent it to me. Is it for real or a put on ? I have not been able to detirmine (sic) which. It's so far out and I'm inclined to think someone was on a heavy trip when it was recorded.

A few years ago I received another LP made in England titled "Throbbing Gristle's" Greatest Hits. It was put out by Industrial Record's, London. At the bottom of the liner notes written by a Claude Bessy was a line that read "this album is dedicated to Martin Denny". Have you ever heard of this record? At the bottom of the LP jacket cover the slogan read: Entertainment through Pain" . There is a reference to a P Orridge which is also mentioned in the R.U. Xperienced LP.

Could you clear up this mystery to me. I do have a sense of humor. However both these recordings leaves me incredulous that someone would go to the expense of producing both of these records or is it intended to be a shocker?

I would appreciate a reply.

Sincerely,
Martin Denny

Included was a photocopy of the back of the TG greatest hits sleeve.

So about a year later I was working on my solo Wax Trax project and I called Mr. Denny and I tell him I received his letter and I'm getting back to him and he replies, " It took you a year to respond to me !!!!" I excused myself and explained that I had been on tour a lot and living in England and that I'm working on a song about this now and that I was taping the conversation, (which I don't think really registered with him). So we began talking about Throbbing Gristle and we had a funny, pleasant chat which I sampled quite a bit of and used on my song. He provided such concise sound bites.

He did have a funny anecdote about when he started his career people in LA were making fun of his records and one time he heard a radio dj announce that he had a new record by Martin Denny and he played this horribly out of tune piss take on him. So he went out looking for the actual record and he found it and the cover was a close up of 2 hands on a piano keyboard. But if you looked closely, they were 2 left hands.

When my Fred CD came out I sent him a copy but I never heard back from him. Maybe he didn't have a CD player ?

telepathic regards,
Ĩed




(Edited to add photo of Martin Denny's letter on his cool stationery.)

[ This Message was edited by: AceExplorer 2018-08-23 13:18 ]



Nice research Ace. The FRED CD actually has an exotica type track on it called Letter From Mr. Denny. Good stuff!!


 
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