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Tiki Central Forums » » Tiki Music » » Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge 1-9-19 Elinor & NYC
Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge 1-9-19 Elinor & NYC
Dr. Zarkov
Tiki Socialite

Joined: Mar 07, 2008
Posts: 598
Posted: 8 days ago; 6:57 pm   Permalink

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge January 9, 2019

On this Wednesday’s Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge radio show we will honor the imminent birthday celebration of the doctor’s canonical wife, the beauteous and talented Elinor Coleman, who lived and worked in Soho New York for 23 years and who still misses The City That Never Sleeps.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge show is broadcast on Wednesdays, 5-6 pm Eastern Standard Time (2-3 pm on the West Coast and 10-11 GMT in Europe) at
www.radiofairfax.org. Radio Fairfax also can be heard on Tune In Radio at tunein.com, and streamed on smartphones by downloading the Tunein app. It also can be streamed on Roku and Google TV at: http://tinyurl.com/3uqfsz9

Past shows from this year are now available to listen to in their entirety at: https://www.mixcloud.com/Flashfriend/

1) “This Is the Naked City,” was composed by George Dunning and conducted by Morris Stoloff for the 1958-63 TV series The Naked City, which was about police detectives in New York City, daringly derived from the bulging box set: Jazz on Film…Crime Jazz!

2) “Penthouse Serenade (When We're Alone)” the 1933 song by Will Jason and Val Burton, was vocalized in 1945 by Anita O’Day, ably accompanied by The Nat King Cole Trio, with Cole on Piano, Oscar Moore on Electric Guitar and Johnny Miller on Bass, and that appears on the beneficial box set: Young Anita.

3) “Manhattan Minuet” comes from the historical document: The Music of Raymond Scott -- Reckless Nights and Turkish Twilights. It was used in the 1938 movie: Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm in the dance finale performed by Shirley Temple and Bill “Bojangles” Robinson.

4) “Mambo a la Savoy” was laid down in 1956 by Machito and his Orchestra and can be found on his magisterial collection: El Padrino.

5) “Manhattan Idyl,” by Henri René & His Orchestra originally appeared on one the RCA Stereo Action Series of demonstration LPs that were introduced in 1961 and was finely found of the academical anthology: The History of Space Age Pop, Vol. 3: The Stereo Action Dimension.

6) “Gentleman Friend” by Richard Levine and Arnold Horwitt for the 1948 Broadway musical: Make Mine Manhattan, was vocally and pianistically rendered by Blossom Dearie on her 1959 amorous album: My Gentleman Friend, with Kenny Burrell on Electric Guitar, Ray Brown on Bass; and Ed Thigpen on Drums.

7) “Sub-Manhattan Blues (Subway Train)” was written and arranged by Bob Thompson for his 1960 epical album: The Sound of Speed, with the Orchestra Dei Concerti di Roma conducted by Paul Baron.

8) “Give It Back to the Indians” is daffily drawn from Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Rodgers and Hart Songbook. It debuted in the 1939 Broadway musical: Too Many Girls, and was waxed by Madame Fitzgerald in 1957, with the orchestra and strings arranged and conducted by Buddy Bregman, including: Paul Smith on Piano; Bob Cooper, Bud Shank and Ted Nash on Reeds; Maynard Ferguson, Pete Candoli, Conrad Gozzo and Ray Linn on Trumpets; Vincent DeRosa on French Horn; Barney Kessel on Electric Guitar; Corky Hale on Harp; Joe Mondragon on Bass and Alvin Stoller on Drums.

9) “New York City Blues” was composed by the singer Peggy Lee and Quincy Jones for her 1961 ambling album: Blues Cross Country, featuring Jimmy Rowles on Piano, Dennis Budmir on Electric Guitar, Max Bennett on Bass Stan Levey on Drums and Francisco “Chino” Pozo on Bongo Drums.

10) “Broadway” was written by Buddy DeSylva, Lew Brown and Ray Henderson/ for the 1927 Broadway musical: Manhattan Mary, and was performed in 1956 by the Conga Drums master Candido Camero on his percussive recording simply titled: Candido, including Al Cohn on Tenor Sax, Dick Katz on Piano, Joe Puma on Guitar, Whitey Mitchell on Bass and Ted Sommer on Drums.

11) “Manhattan” the classic composition by Rodgers & Hart for the 1925 Broadway revue: Garrick Gaieties, was sung by Annie Ross on her 1956 eveningesque album: Nocturne for a Vocalist, with Tony Crombie on Piano; Bob Burns on Clarinet; Roy Plummer on Electric Guitar; and Lennie Rush on Bass.

12) “Love for Sale,” the classic lament inked by Cole Porter for the 1934 Broadway musical: The New Yorkers, was arranged and conducted with a Latinesque tinge by Marty Paich for his 1959 outstanding album: I Get a Boot Out of You, including Jack Sheldon, Al Porcino and Conte Candoli on Trumpet, Bob Enevoldsen on Valve Trombone, George Roberts on Baritone Trombone, Vince DeRosa on French Horn, Art Pepper on Alto Sax, Bill Perkins on Tenor Sax, Bill Hood on Baritone Sax, Victor Feldman on Vibes, Russ Freeman on Piano, Joe Mondragon on Bass and Mel Lewis on Drums.

13) “Down in the Depths (of the 90th Floor)” was inked by Cole Porter for the 1936 Broadway musical: Red, Hot and Blue sung by Johnny Hartman on his 1966 labial LP: Unforgettable, supported by Mike Melvoin on Piano; John Gray on Electric Guitar; Anthony Ortega on Alto Sax; Jack Nimitz on Baritone Sax; Curtis Amy, Teddy Edwards and Harold Land on Tenor Sax; Al Porcino, Bud Brisbois, Freddie Hill, Jules Chaikin and Melvin Moore on Trumpet; Ernie Track, John Erwing, Lester Robertson and Mike Barone on Trombone; Ray Brown on Bass and Stan Levey on Drums.

14) “Ground Floor Rear (Next to the Synagogue)” comes from composer, arranger and conductor Manny Albam and his 1966 creative concept disc: Soul of the City, spotlighting the talents of Hank Jones on Piano, Freddie Hubbard on Trumpet and Richard Davis on Bass, with J.J. Johnson on Trombone, Phil Woods on Alto Sax, Frank Wess on Tenor Sax, Jerome Richardson on Flute and Mike Manieri on Vibes.

15) “Harlem Nocturne,” The 1939 song by Earle Hagen and Dick Rogers, comes from the 1963 louche LP: Mel Tormé Sings Sunday in New York & Other Songs About New York, arranged and conducted by Dick Hazard.


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